Notes

Original poem
by Cicely Fox Smith

Printable version

MP3 Sample

Hastings Mill

Original words by Cicely Fox Smith
in SAILOR TOWN 1919, pp. 56-57

Adapted for singing by Charles Ipcar 2005
Tune: traditional "Cherokee Shuffle"

Back to the List of Songs

Back to the
Charlie Ipcar Home Page

As I went down by Hastings Mill, I lingered in my going,
To sniff the smell of piled-up planks and feel the salt breeze blowing,
And feel the salt breeze blowing;
To hear the cables fret and creak, and the rigging stir and sigh
"Shipmate, oh, my shipmate!" as in those days gone by,
As in those days gone by.

As I went down by Hastings Mill, I saw a ship there lying,
All about her masts and yards the sunset clouds a-flying,
The sunset clouds a-flying;
And I mistook her for the ghost of one I used to know
"Shipmate, oh, my shipmate!" so many years ago,
So many years ago.

picture of Hastings Mill with ships in foreground
picture of sailor chipping rust As I went down by Hastings Mill, I heard a feller singing,
While chipping off the deep-sea rust, above the tide a-swinging,
Above the tide a-swinging;
And well I knew the queer old tune and well the song he sung
"Shipmate, oh, my shipmate!" as when the world was young,
As when the world was young.

(instrumental break)

And past the rowdy Union Wharf, above the tide a-lapping,
To a randy dandy deep-sea tune my heart in time was tapping,
My heart in time was tapping;
To the far off sound all in the dusk of an anchor watch a-hauling
"Shipmate, oh, my shipmate!" with evening shadows falling,
With evening shadows falling!

And the voice of one I knew so well, across the harbour calling
"Shipmate, oh, my shipmate!" with evening shadows falling,
With evening shadows falling!

Back to the top


Notes:

The wood-hulled, steam-powered tug Haro was built in Vancouver for B.C. Mills (Hastings Mill) for its harbor service.

The Hastings Shingle & Manufacturing Company: After a bit of re-organization, the Woods-Spicer Company was bought out for $1,200 by the Hastings Shingle & Manufacturing Company in 1906. Hastings was owned by the McNair brothers.

In 1896 Julius M. Fromme had been appointed supervisor of Hastings' operations on the woods. The Hastings upper mill off Dempsey Road, Vancouver, was built in 1904 and closed in 1910; it is now a museum.

Thomas Allen interviewed the McNairs to buy the Hastings Mill and paid $2,000 in down payment to $20,000. He quickly turned his eyes to real estate so he sold his interests to his partner J.M. Fromme who formed the Lynn Valley Lumber Company.

Location: on the South Shore of Burrard Inlet, near Powell Street

Back to the top


HASTINGS MILL

Original poem by C. Fox Smith, SAILOR TOWN 1919, pp. 56-57

Also in Manuscripts Poetry: An Inventory of Alfred Myrick Pound (1869-1932) His Papers In The Library of the University of British Columbia, Robert Gore, Special Collections Division, 1978, Vancouver, BC

As I went down by Hastings Mill I lingered in my going
To smell the smell of piled-up deals and feel the salt wind blowing,
To hear the cables fret and creak and the ropes stir and sigh
(Shipmate, my shipmate!) as in days gone by.

As I went down by Hastings Mill I saw a ship there lying,
About her tawny yards the little clouds of sunset flying;
And half I took her for the ghost of one I used to know
(Shipmate, my shipmate!) many years ago.

As I went down by Hastings Mill I saw while I stood dreaming
The flicker of her riding light along the ripples streaming,
The bollards where we made her fast and the berth where she did lie
(Shipmate, my shipmate!) in the days gone by.

As I went down by Hastings Mill I heard a fellow singing,
Chipping off the deep sea rust above the tide a-swinging,
And well I knew the queer old tune and well the song he sung
(Shipmate, my shipmate!) when the world was young.

And past the rowdy Union Wharf, and by the still tide sleeping,
To a randy dandy deep sea tune my heart in time was keeping,
To the thin far sound of a shadowy watch a-hauling,
And the voice of one I knew across the high tide calling
(Shipmate, my shipmate!) and the late dusk falling!

Back to the top