Original poem
by John Masefield

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Hell's Pavement

Poem by John Masefield
In Salt-Water Poems & Ballads 1921, p. 25
Arrangement and new words by Charles Ipcar,
Norris Dale & Judy Barrows 2004

Tune: Charles Ipcar, Music Hall style

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"Now, When I'm discharged at Liverpool 'n' draws me bit o' pay,
I'll never, never, go to sea no more;
I'll court a pretty little lass 'n' have a weddin' day,
'N' settle down some quiet place ashore;
I'll never go to sea again a-temptin' Davy Jones,
Hearkening to them cruel sharks a-hungerin' for me bones;
I'll run a blushin' dairyfarm or go a-crackin' stones,
Or buy 'n' keep a little liquor store."

Oh, I'll never go to sea again to plow the ocean deep,
No more I'll hear "All hands aloft" to rob me of me sleep;
I'll settle ninety miles from shore, no more the pier head leap,
I'll never, never, go to sea no more!

Then, they towed her in to Liverpool, we made the hooker fast,
And the copper-bound official paid the crew (paid the crew),
So I drew me money, but me money didn't last,
For I went and painted Lime Street blue (so blue),
It was rum for Poll, and rum for Nan, and gin for Jolly Jack;
I shipped a week later in the clothes upon me back;
And I had to pinch a little straw, I had to beg a sack,
To sleep on, when me watch was through.

But, I'll never go to sea again to plow the ocean deep,
No more I'll hear "All hands aloft" to rob me of my sleep
I'll settle ninety miles from shore, no more the pier head leap,
I'll never, never, go to sea no more!

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Poem by John Masefield
In Salt-Water Poems & Ballads 1921, p. 25

Hell's Pavement

"When I'm discharged at Liverpool 'n' draws my bit o' pay,
I won't come to sea no more;
I'll court a pretty little lass 'n' have a weddin' day,
'N' settle somewhere down shore;
I'll never fare to sea again a-temptin' Davy Jones,
A-hearkening to the cruel sharks a-hungerin' for my bones;
I'll run a blushin' dairy-farm or go a-crackin' stones,
Or buy 'n' keep a little liquor-store"
So he said.

They towed her in to Liverpool, we made the hooker fast,
And the copper-bound official paid the crew,
And Billy drew his money, but the money didn't last,
For he painted the alongshore blue,
It was rum for Poll, and rum for Nan, and gin for Jolly Jack;
He shipped a week later in the clothes upon his back;
He had to pinch a little straw, he had to beg a sack
To sleep on, when his watch was through,
So he did.

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